Tag Archives: GRE test scores

The Revised GRE and the Old 200 – 800 Score Format

As you know, the Revised GRE has a new scoring scale.  For:

GRE Verbal: 130 – 170

GRE Quantitative: 130 – 170

GRE Writing: 0 – 6

The scores on the new scale  will not  be released  until  November of 2011.

It is interesting that those  who are taking the Revised GRE are receiving instant score approximations based on the old 200 – 800 scale.

In the words of GRE:

“Viewing unofficial scores:

At the test center, from August through November, you will see score ranges on the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections based on the prior 200 – 800 score scale. Because of the essay scoring process, you won’t be able to view your Analytical Writing scores at that time.

Starting in December, you will see your unofficial Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning scores at the test center. Scores will be based on the 130 – 170 score scale, in 1-point increments.”

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GRE Insurance – take the GRE while you are still in school!

On Sunday July 24, 2011 the New  York Times published a story about the GRE Preparation experience for those who have been away from academia and are intending to return to graduate school. The article began with the following comment:

“On the first day of test prep, after we had tackled a mini-G.R.E., the instructor assured our class that though she was 30 years old, she was still up on the latest test-taking trends. Finally, I thought, a problem I could easily solve. Answer: the last math class I had taken was three years before she was born.”

(I invite you to read the complete article here.)

Peak Performance on the GRE, GMAT, LSAT, MCAT and other admission tests is partly a function of being in “top test taking shape”.  When you are in school, you are taking tests all the time. Once you leave school you will lose your “test taking conditioning”. In addition, don’t forget that the longer you wait the harder it will be to relearn and use important skills (particularly in the area of math). This point is underscored in the article where the author states that:

“Mean GMAT scores decline with age: 26- and 27-year-olds score on average a 572; 28- to 30-year-olds, 565; 40- to 49-year-olds, 501; and 50-plus, 486, according to the Graduate Management Admission Council, which administers the test.”

Our advice: In order to make future graduate school admission easier, take the appropriate admission test while you are still in school. GMAT test scores, LSAT test scores  and GRE test scores are good for a number of years. Take the test now!